Home » 2006 Saving Planet Earth From Global Warming And Climate Change: Reducing Your Carbon Footprint And Lowering The Emission Of Greenhouse Gases by Unknown Author 173
2006 Saving Planet Earth From Global Warming And Climate Change: Reducing Your Carbon Footprint And Lowering The Emission Of Greenhouse Gases Unknown Author 173

2006 Saving Planet Earth From Global Warming And Climate Change: Reducing Your Carbon Footprint And Lowering The Emission Of Greenhouse Gases

Unknown Author 173

Published
ISBN : 9781422006214
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 About the Book 

This up-to-date and comprehensive electronic book on CD-ROM provides vital information for anyone concerned about saving Planet Earth from the ongoing crisis of global warming and climate change, which is causing the sea level to rise, glaciers toMoreThis up-to-date and comprehensive electronic book on CD-ROM provides vital information for anyone concerned about saving Planet Earth from the ongoing crisis of global warming and climate change, which is causing the sea level to rise, glaciers to melt, coastlines to be destroyed, and ecosystems to be damaged. You can make a difference! There are smart tips to protect the Earth – in the home, in the yard, at the store, at your office or place of business, and on the road. This collection of important documents, reports, and publications about every facet of the vital issue of global warming and climate change will give you a complete understanding of the issue – and knowledge is power! Topices covered in detail include: greenhouse gases (carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide), emissions and impacts, the global carbon cycle, land-use and land-cover changes, ecosystems, observation and monitoring, American and international research and cooperation, human contributions and responses, sea level rises, beach erosion, wetlands, global water cycle, climate variability, solar influence, future climate trends and computer models, uncertainties, possible effect on extreme weather and hurricanes, science programs, and ways to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. There is material for everyone with an interest in this crucial matter: concerned citizens, educators and students, scientific researchers, small business and , industry people, public officials, coastal residents, health professionals, weather experts, and outdoor enthusiasts. There is no better source of up-to-date material on global warming and climate change. According to the National Academy of Sciences, the Earths surface temperature has risen by about 1 degree Fahrenheit in the past century, with accelerated warming during the past two decades. There is new and stronger evidence that most of the warming over the last 50 years is attributable to human activities. Human activities have altered the chemical composition of the atmosphere through the buildup of greenhouse gases – primarily carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide. The heat-trapping property of these gases is undisputed although uncertainties exist about exactly how earth’s climate responds to them. Energy from the sun drives the earth’s weather and climate, and heats the earth’s surface- in turn, the earth radiates energy back into space. Atmospheric greenhouse gases (water vapor, carbon dioxide, and other gases) trap some of the outgoing energy, retaining heat somewhat like the glass panels of a greenhouse. Without this natural “greenhouse effect,” temperatures! would be much lower than they are now, and life as known today would not be possible. Instead, thanks to greenhouse gases, the earth’s average temperature is a more hospitable 60°F. However, problems may arise when the atmospheric concentration of greenhouse gases increases. Since the beginning of the industrial revolution, atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide have increased nearly 30%, methane concentrations have more than doubled, and nitrous oxide concentrations have risen by about 15%. These increases have enhanced the heat-trapping capability of the earth’s atmosphere. Sulfate aerosols, a common air pollutant, cool the atmosphere by reflecting light back into space- however, sulfates are short-lived in the atmosphere and vary regionally. Scientists generally believe that the combustion of fossil fuels and other human activities are the primary reason for the increased concentration of carbon dioxide. Plant respiration and the decomposition of organic matter release more than 10 times the CO2 released by human activities- but these releases have generally been in balance during the centuries leading up to the industrial revolution with carbon dioxide absorbed by terrestrial vegetation and the oceans. What has changed in the last few hundred years is the additional release of carbon dioxide by human activities. In all, th